Tasmania






Tasmania

Tasmania - Australian - Australia State - Island Living

New Zealand - Fraser Island - Big Island - Thousand Islands






Australia And New Zealand As The Home Of A New Sub-race

RRP $49.99

Click on the Google Preview image above to read some pages of this book!

Adherents of theosophy, the esoteric philosophy popular at the turn of the 20th century, believed that science and religion could be reconciled, and that the plan of the universe could and should be understood, and that it was humanity's duty to adapt to that plan. Here, in a series of lectures delivered in Sydney, Australia, in 1915, the renowned spiritualist Charles W. Leadbeater, a leader of theosophical thought, celebrates the new "sub-race" of humanity come to joyful life in the immigrant nations of America, Australia, and New Zealand, where, freed from the social shackles of Old World Europe, races and classes were intermingling to create a new kind of culture, which would in turn reshape the world. Far-reaching and perceptive, this is an extraordinary little volume of social insight and criticism. British author CHARLES WEBSTER LEADBEATER (1854-1934) was ordained as an Anglican priest, but later joined the prominent Theosophical Society and traveled to India to study alternative spiritual and occult practices, eventually settling into his life as a clairvoyant and author. His other works include Man Visible and Invisible and The Science of the Sacrament.


The New Zealand Hobbit Crisis

RRP $18.99

Click on the Google Preview image above to read some pages of this book!

All was not well in Middle-earth . . . After the third Lord of the Rings movie premiered in 2003, fans of the series eagerly anticipated production and release of its prequel, The Hobbit. It turned out they had a while to wait, as a series of troubles delayed production for years. Then, in September 2010, when almost everything seemed resolved, U.S. and international actors unions issued a pub-lic alert advising their members "not to accept work on this non-union production." Warner Bros. threatened to rip the troubled production from the country and events quickly spiraled out of control. New Zealand plunged into crisis. Saving the Hobbit was do or die for the local film industry, and the government scrambled to avoid disaster. Protests and rallies erupted and the island nation's currency fell on the possibility of losing the half-billion dollar project. Director Peter Jackson vowed to "fight like hell" to keep the shoot in New Zealand. But then studio executives flew in from Los Angeles like colonial masters ready to bring down the hammer. What happened next was almost unbelievable - and proved, if nothing else, that not all Hollywood drama is on the screen. This short book (70 pp. plus bibliography, etc.) tells the tale.


Te Puna - A New Zealand Mission Station

RRP $326.99

Click on the Google Preview image above to read some pages of this book!

Evangelical missionary societies have been associated with the processes of colonisation throughout the globe, from India to Africa and into the Pacific. In late 18th-century Britain, the Church Missionary Society for Africa and the East (CMS) began its missionary ventures, and in the first decade of the 19th-century, sent three of its members to New South Wales, Australia, and then on to New Zealand, an unknown, little-explored part of the world.

Across the globe, a common material culture travelled with its evangelizing (and later colonizing) settlers, with artefacts appearing as cultural markers from Cape Town in South Africa, to Tasmania in Australia and the even more remote Bay of Islands in New Zealand. After missionization, colonization occurred. Additionally, common themes of interaction with indigenous peoples, household economy, the development of commerce, and social and gender relations also played out in these communities.

This work is unique in that it provides the first archaeological examination of a New Zealand mission station, and as such, makes an important contribution to New Zealand historical archaeology and history. It also situates the case study in a global context, making a significant contribution to the international field of mission archaeology. It informs a wider audience about the processes of colonization and culture contact in New Zealand, along with the details of the material culture of the countrya (TM)s first European settlers, providing a point of comparison with other outposts of British colonization.


A New Research Agenda For Improvements In Quality Of Life

RRP $354.99

Click on the Google Preview image above to read some pages of this book!

This book presents a new research agenda for improvements in Quality of Life research. It includes topics such as:

-Studying QoL in particular subpopulations and selected subgroups

-Disentangling the difficult task of identifying determinants of QoL

-Perfectionating the measurement of conceptual dimensions

-Defining new indicators able to measure and monitor particular social conditions and shows that these are not separated fields of studies but intersect each other and produce different outcomes which can be with difficulty classifiable, consistent with the idea of the complexity of our reality.

The volume presents micro perspectives by taking into account the macro situation through both qualitative and quantitative approaches.


The New Zealand Hobbit Crisis

RRP $18.99

Click on the Google Preview image above to read some pages of this book!

All was not well in Middle-earth . . . After the third Lord of the Rings movie premiered in 2003, fans of the series eagerly anticipated production and release of its prequel, The Hobbit. It turned out they had a while to wait, as a series of troubles delayed production for years. Then, in September 2010, when almost everything seemed resolved, U.S. and international actors unions issued a pub-lic alert advising their members "not to accept work on this non-union production." Warner Bros. threatened to rip the troubled production from the country and events quickly spiraled out of control. New Zealand plunged into crisis. Saving the Hobbit was do or die for the local film industry, and the government scrambled to avoid disaster. Protests and rallies erupted and the island nation's currency fell on the possibility of losing the half-billion dollar project. Director Peter Jackson vowed to "fight like hell" to keep the shoot in New Zealand. But then studio executives flew in from Los Angeles like colonial masters ready to bring down the hammer. What happened next was almost unbelievable - and proved, if nothing else, that not all Hollywood drama is on the screen. This short book (70 pp. plus bibliography, etc.) tells the tale.



Search

Tasmania Articles

Tasmania Australian Australia State Island Living
New Zealand Fraser Island Big Island Thousand Islands

Tasmania Books

Tasmania Australian Australia State Island Living
New Zealand Fraser Island Big Island Thousand Islands

Tasmania